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Re-partitioning 2

Jonathan Lewis - Mon, 2019-05-27 14:20

Last week I wrote a note about turning a range-partitioned table into a range/list composite partitioned table using features included in 12.2 of Oracle. But my example was really just an outline of the method and bypassed a number of the little extra problems you’re likely to see in a real-world system, so in this note I’m going to bring in an issue that you might run into – and which I’ve seen appearing a number of times: ORA-14097: column type or size mismatch in ALTER TABLE EXCHANGE PARTITION.

It’s often the case that a system has a partitioned table that’s been around for a long time, and over its lifetime it may have had (real or virtual) columns added, made inivisble, dropped, or mark unused. As a result you may find that the apparent definition of the table is not the same as the real definition of the table – and that’s why Oracle has given us (in 12c) the option to “create table for exchange”.

You might like to read a MoS note giving you one example of a problem with creating an exchange table prior to this new feature. ORA-14097 At Exchange Partition After Adding Column With Default Value (Doc ID 1334763.1) I’ve created a little model by cloning the code from that note.


rem
rem     Script:         pt_exchange_problem.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          May 2019
rem

create table mtab (pcol number)
partition by list (pcol) (
        partition p1 values (1),
        partition p2 values (2)
);

alter table mtab add col2 number default 0 not null;

prompt  ========================================
prompt  Traditional creation method => ORA-14097
prompt  ========================================

create table mtab_p2 as select * from mtab where 1=0;
alter table mtab exchange partition P2 with table mtab_p2;

prompt  ===================
prompt  Create for exchange
prompt  ===================

drop table mtab_p2 purge;
create table mtab_p2 for exchange with table mtab;
alter table mtab exchange partition P2 with table mtab_p2;

[/sourcecode}


Here's the output from running this on an instance of 18.3


Table created.

Table altered.

========================================
Traditional creation method => ORA-14097
========================================

Table created.

alter table mtab exchange partition P2 with table mtab_p2
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-14097: column type or size mismatch in ALTER TABLE EXCHANGE PARTITION

===================
Create for exchange
===================

Table dropped.


Table created.


Table altered.

So we don’t have to worry about problems creating an exchange table in Oracle 12c or later. But we do still have a problem if we’re trying to convert our range-partitioned table into a range/list composite partitioned table by doing using the “double-exchange” method. In my simple example I used a “create table” statement to create an empty table that we could exchange into; but without another special version of a “create table” command I won’t be able to create a composite partitioned table that is compatible with the simple table that I want to use as my intermediate table.

Here’s the solution to that problem – first in a thumbnail sketch:

  • create a table for exchange (call it table C)
  • alter table C modify to change it to a composite partitioned table with one subpartition per partition
  • create a table for exchange (call it table E)
  • Use table E to exchange partitions from the original table to the (now-partitioned) table C
  • Split each partition of table C into the specific subpartitions required

And now some code to work through the details – first the code to create and populate the partitioned table.


rem
rem     Script:         pt_comp_from_pt_2.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          May 2019
rem

drop table t purge;
drop table pt_range purge;
drop table pt_range_list purge;

-- @@setup

create table pt_range (
        id              number(8,0)     not null,
        grp             varchar2(1)     not null,
        small_vc        varchar2(10),
        padding         varchar2(100)
)
partition by range(id) (
        partition p200 values less than (200),
        partition p400 values less than (400),
        partition p600 values less than (600)
)
;

insert into pt_range
select
        rownum-1,
        mod(rownum,2),
        lpad(rownum,10,'0'),
        rpad('x',100,'x')
from
        all_objects
where
	rownum <= 600 -- > comment to avoid WordPress format issue
;

commit;

Then some code to create the beginnings of the target composite partitioned table. We create a simple heap table “for exchange”, then modify it to be a composite partitioned table with a named starting partition and high_value and a template defining a single subpartition then, as a variant on the example from last week, specifying interval partitioning.


prompt	==========================================
prompt	First nice feature - "create for exchange"
prompt	==========================================

create table pt_range_list for exchange with table pt_range;

prompt	============================================
prompt	Now alter the table to composite partitioned
prompt	============================================

alter table pt_range_list modify
partition by range(id) interval (200)
subpartition by list (grp) 
subpartition template (
        subpartition p_def      values(default)
)
(
	partition p200 values less than (200)
)
;

If you want to do the conversion from range partitioning to interval partitioning you will have to check very carefully that your original table will be able to convert safely – which means you’ll need to check that the “high_value” values for the partitions are properly spaced to match the interval you’ve defined and (as a special requirement for the conversion) there are no omissions from the current list of high values. If your original table doesn’t match these requirement exactly you may end up trying to exchange data into a partition where it doesn’t belong; for example, if my original table had partitions with high value of 200, 600, 800 then there may be values in the 200-399 range currently stored in the original “600” range partition which shouldn’t go into the new “600” interval partition. You may find you have to split (and/or merge) a few partitions in your range-partitioned table before you can do the main conversion.

Now we create create the table that we’ll actually use for the exchange and go through each exchange in turn. Because I’ve got an explicitly named starting partition the first exchange takes only two steps – exchange out, exchange in. But because I’m using interval partitioning in the composite partitioned table I’m doing a “lock partition” before the second exchange on all the other partitions as this will bring the required target partition into existence. I’m also using the “[sub]partition for()” syntax to identify the pairs of [sub]partitions – this isn’t necessary for the original range-partitioned table, of course, but it’s the only way I can identify the generated subpartitions that will appear in the composite partitioned table.


create table t for exchange with table pt_range;

prompt	=======================================================================
prompt	Double exchange to move a partition to become a composite subpartition
prompt	Could drive this programatically by picking one row from each partition
prompt	=======================================================================

alter table pt_range exchange partition p200 with table t;
alter table pt_range_list exchange subpartition p200_p_def with table t;

alter table pt_range exchange partition for (399) with table t;
lock  table pt_range_list partition for (399) in exclusive mode;
alter table pt_range_list exchange subpartition for (399,'0') with table t;

alter table pt_range exchange partition for (599) with table t;
lock  table pt_range_list partition for (599) in exclusive mode;
alter table pt_range_list exchange subpartition for (599,'0') with table t;

prompt	=====================================
prompt	Show that we've got the data in place
prompt	=====================================

execute dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user,'pt_range_list',granularity=>'ALL')

break on partition_name skip 1

select  partition_name, subpartition_name, num_rows 
from    user_tab_subpartitions 
where   table_name = 'PT_RANGE_LIST'
order by
        partition_name, subpartition_name
;

Now that the data is in the target table we can split each default subpartition into the four subpartitions that we want for each partition. To cater for the future, though, I’ve first modified the subpartition template so that each new partition will have four subpartitions (though the naming convention won’t be applied, of course, Oracle will generate system name for all new partitions and subpartitions).


prompt  ================================================
prompt  Change the subpartition template to what we want
prompt  ================================================

alter table pt_range_list
set subpartition template(
        subpartition p_0 values (0),
        subpartition p_1 values (1),
        subpartition p_2 values (2),
        subpartition p_def values (default)
)
;

prompt  ====================================================
prompt  Second nice feature - multiple splits in one command
prompt  Again, first split is fixed name.
prompt  We could do this online after allowing the users in
prompt  ====================================================

alter table pt_range_list split subpartition p200_p_def
        into (
                subpartition p200_p_0 values(0),
                subpartition p200_p_1 values(1),
                subpartition p200_p_2 values(2),
                subpartition p200_p_def
        )
;

alter table pt_range_list split subpartition for (399,'0')
        into (
                subpartition p400_p_0 values(0),
                subpartition p400_p_1 values(1),
                subpartition p400_p_2 values(2),
                subpartition p400_p_def
        )
;

alter table pt_range_list split subpartition for (599,'0')
        into (
                subpartition p600_p_0 values(0),
                subpartition p600_p_1 values(1),
                subpartition p600_p_2 values(2),
                subpartition p600_p_def
        )
;

Finally a little demonstration that we can’t add an explicitly named partition to the interval partitioned table; then we insert a row to generate the partition and show that it has 4 subpartitions.

Finishing off we rename everything (though that’s a fairly pointless exercise).


prompt  ==============================================================
prompt  Could try adding a partition to show it uses the new template
prompt  But that's not allowed for interval partitions: "ORA-14760:"
prompt  ADD PARTITION is not permitted on Interval partitioned objects
prompt  So insert a value that would go into the next (800) partition
prompt  ==============================================================

alter table pt_range_list add partition p800 values less than (800);

insert into pt_range_list (
        id, grp, small_vc, padding
)
values ( 
        799, '0', lpad(799,10,'0'), rpad('x',100,'x')
)
;

commit;

prompt  ===================================================
prompt  Template naming is not used for the subpartitions,
prompt  so we have to use the "subpartition for()" strategy 
prompt  ===================================================

alter table pt_range_list rename subpartition for (799,'0') to p800_p_0;
alter table pt_range_list rename subpartition for (799,'1') to p800_p_1;
alter table pt_range_list rename subpartition for (799,'2') to p800_p_2;
alter table pt_range_list rename subpartition for (799,'3') to p800_p_def;

prompt  ==============================================
prompt  Might as well clean up the partition names too
prompt  ==============================================

alter table pt_range_list rename partition for (399) to p400;
alter table pt_range_list rename partition for (599) to p600;
alter table pt_range_list rename partition for (799) to p800;

prompt  =======================================
prompt  Finish off by listing the subpartitions 
prompt  =======================================

execute dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user,'pt_range_list',granularity=>'ALL')

select  partition_name, subpartition_name, num_rows 
from    user_tab_subpartitions 
where   table_name = 'PT_RANGE_LIST'
order by
        partition_name, subpartition_name
;

It’s worth pointing out that you could do the exchanges (and the splitting and renaming at the same time) through some sort of simple PL/SQL loop – looping through the named partitions in the original table and using a row from the first exchange to drive the lock and second exchange (and splitting and renaming). For exanple something like the following which doesn’t have any of the error-trapping and defensive mechanisms you’d want to use on a production system:



declare
        m_pt_val number;
begin
        for r in (select partition_name from user_tab_partitions where table_name = 'PT_RANGE' order by partition_position) 
        loop
                execute immediate
                        'alter table pt_range exchange partition ' || r.partition_name ||
                        ' with table t';
        
                select id into m_pt_val from t where rownum = 1;
        
                execute immediate 
                        'lock table pt_range_list partition for (' || m_pt_val || ') in exclusive mode';
        
                execute immediate
                        'alter table pt_range_list exchange subpartition  for (' || m_pt_val || ',0)' ||
                        ' with table t';
        
        end loop;
end;
/

If you do go for a programmed loop you have to be really careful to consider what could go wrong at each step of the loop and how your program is going to report (and possibly attempt to recover) the situation. This is definitely a case where you don’t want code with “when others then null” appearing anywhere, and don’t be tempted to include code to truncate the exchange table.

 

Oracle Integration Cloud Services (OIC) Training: Step By Step Activity Guides/Hands-On Lab Exercise

Online Apps DBA - Mon, 2019-05-27 09:00

Oracle Integration Cloud Services (OIC): Step By Step Activity Guides/Hands-On Lab Exercise Find out How You Can be an Expert in Integration Cloud Service by going through the Hands-On Lab Exercises at https://k21academy.com/oic05 & get in-depth, Stepwise Study for: ► Hands-On Activity Guides that you must perform in order to learn Oracle Integration Cloud Service(OIC) […]

The post Oracle Integration Cloud Services (OIC) Training: Step By Step Activity Guides/Hands-On Lab Exercise appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

RMAN Incremental & Demo Part 1 (Level 0)

Zed DBA's Oracle Blog - Mon, 2019-05-27 07:15

This blog post is part of the “RMAN Back to Basics” series, which can be found here.

Incremental Backup

An incremental backup only backup up those data blocks that have changed since the last backup.

Types of Incremental Backups

There are 2 types of Incremental Backups:

  1. Level 0 are a base for subsequent backups.  Copies all blocks containing data similar to a full backup, with the only difference that full backups are never included in an incremental strategy.  Level 0 can be backup sets or image copies.
  2. Level 1 are subsequent backups of a level 0, backing up by default all blocks changed after the most recent level 0 or 1, known as differential incremental backup.  More on different types of level 1 backups is discuss in detail here.
Incremental Level 0 Demo

We take an incremental level 0 backup using my script 5_incremental_level_0.sh:

[oracle@dc1sbxdb001 demo]$ ./5_incremental_level_0.sh
-----------------------
Step 1: Set environment
-----------------------

Setting the Database Environment using oraenv...
The Oracle base remains unchanged with value /u01/app/oracle

ORACLE_SID: ZEDDBA
ORACLE_HOME: /u01/app/oracle/product/12.2.0/dbhome_1

Press Enter to continue

The environment is set to my ZEDDBA database, then next the incremental backup (Level 0) is taken:

---------------------------------------
Step 2: Take Incremental Level 0 Backup
---------------------------------------

Cotent of 5_incremental_level_0.cmd file:

BACKUP INCREMENTAL LEVEL 0 DATABASE TAG 'INCR LEVEL 0';
HOST 'read Press Enter to LIST BACKUP';
LIST BACKUP;

Press Enter to continue

Calling 'rman target / cmdfile=/media/sf_Software/scripts/demo/5_incremental_level_0.cmd'

Recovery Manager: Release 12.2.0.1.0 - Production on Mon May 20 17:13:13 2019

Copyright (c) 1982, 2017, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

connected to target database: ZEDDBA (DBID=3520942925)

RMAN> BACKUP INCREMENTAL LEVEL 0 DATABASE TAG 'INCR LEVEL 0';
2> HOST 'read Press Enter to LIST BACKUP';
3> LIST BACKUP;
4> 
Starting backup at 20-MAY-19
using target database control file instead of recovery catalog
allocated channel: ORA_DISK_1
channel ORA_DISK_1: SID=15 device type=DISK
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting incremental level 0 datafile backup set
channel ORA_DISK_1: specifying datafile(s) in backup set
input datafile file number=00001 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gftkr3fv_.dbf
input datafile file number=00002 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gftkr792_.dbf
input datafile file number=00003 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gftkr944_.dbf
input datafile file number=00004 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gftkr9fc_.dbf
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting piece 1 at 20-MAY-19
channel ORA_DISK_1: finished piece 1 at 20-MAY-19
piece handle=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_20/o1_mf_nnnd0_INCR_LEVEL_0_gg5njx01_.bkp tag=INCR LEVEL 0 comment=NONE
channel ORA_DISK_1: backup set complete, elapsed time: 00:00:07
Finished backup at 20-MAY-19

Starting Control File and SPFILE Autobackup at 20-MAY-19
piece handle=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_20/o1_mf_s_1008782004_gg5nk4cs_.bkp comment=NONE
Finished Control File and SPFILE Autobackup at 20-MAY-19


host command complete

We use host within RMAN just to wait for input before moving on for demo purposes.  Next we list the backup within RMAN using ‘LIST BACKUP‘:

List of Backup Sets
===================

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
1 Full 498.93M DISK 00:00:08 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 1 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: FULL BACKUP
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_nnndf_FULL_BACKUP_gfv4k119_.bkp
List of Datafiles in backup set 1
File LV Type Ckp SCN Ckp Time Abs Fuz SCN Sparse Name
---- -- ---- ---------- --------- ----------- ------ ----
1 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gftkr3fv_.dbf
2 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gftkr792_.dbf
3 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gftkr944_.dbf
4 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gftkr9fc_.dbf

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
2 Full 8.31M DISK 00:00:00 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 2 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: TAG20190516T173912
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_16/o1_mf_s_1008437952_gfv4kjko_.bkp
SPFILE Included: Modification time: 16-MAY-19
SPFILE db_unique_name: ZEDDBA
Control File Included: Ckp SCN: 353836 Ckp time: 16-MAY-19

BS Key Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
3 77.83M DISK 00:00:01 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 3 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: FULL BACKUP PLUS ARCHIVELOG
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_annnn_FULL_BACKUP_PLUS_ARC_gfv4y7m2_.bkp

List of Archived Logs in backup set 3
Thrd Seq Low SCN Low Time Next SCN Next Time
---- ------- ---------- --------- ---------- ---------
1 13 332298 16-MAY-19 354044 16-MAY-19

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
4 Full 498.94M DISK 00:00:06 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 4 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: TAG20190516T174603
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_nnndf_TAG20190516T174603_gfv4yco3_.bkp
List of Datafiles in backup set 4
File LV Type Ckp SCN Ckp Time Abs Fuz SCN Sparse Name
---- -- ---- ---------- --------- ----------- ------ ----
1 Full 354058 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gftkr3fv_.dbf
2 Full 354058 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gftkr792_.dbf
3 Full 354058 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gftkr944_.dbf
4 Full 354058 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gftkr9fc_.dbf

BS Key Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
5 3.50K DISK 00:00:00 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 5 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: FULL BACKUP PLUS ARCHIVELOG
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_annnn_FULL_BACKUP_PLUS_ARC_gfv4ym4v_.bkp

List of Archived Logs in backup set 5
Thrd Seq Low SCN Low Time Next SCN Next Time
---- ------- ---------- --------- ---------- ---------
1 14 354044 16-MAY-19 354066 16-MAY-19

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
6 Full 8.31M DISK 00:00:00 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 6 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: TAG20190516T174612
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_16/o1_mf_s_1008438372_gfv4ynmv_.bkp
SPFILE Included: Modification time: 16-MAY-19
SPFILE db_unique_name: ZEDDBA
Control File Included: Ckp SCN: 354077 Ckp time: 16-MAY-19

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
7 Full 8.31M DISK 00:00:00 17-MAY-19 
BP Key: 7 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: TAG20190517T165453
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_17/o1_mf_s_1008521693_gfxpbfs7_.bkp
SPFILE Included: Modification time: 17-MAY-19
SPFILE db_unique_name: ZEDDBA
Control File Included: Ckp SCN: 458035 Ckp time: 17-MAY-19

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
8 Incr 0 511.64M DISK 00:00:05 20-MAY-19 
BP Key: 8 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: INCR LEVEL 0
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_20/o1_mf_nnnd0_INCR_LEVEL_0_gg5njx01_.bkp
List of Datafiles in backup set 8
File LV Type Ckp SCN Ckp Time Abs Fuz SCN Sparse Name
---- -- ---- ---------- --------- ----------- ------ ----
1 0 Incr 571045 20-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gftkr3fv_.dbf
2 0 Incr 571045 20-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gftkr792_.dbf
3 0 Incr 571045 20-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gftkr944_.dbf
4 0 Incr 571045 20-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gftkr9fc_.dbf

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
9 Full 8.31M DISK 00:00:00 20-MAY-19 
BP Key: 9 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: TAG20190520T171324
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_20/o1_mf_s_1008782004_gg5nk4cs_.bkp
SPFILE Included: Modification time: 20-MAY-19
SPFILE db_unique_name: ZEDDBA
Control File Included: Ckp SCN: 571056 Ckp time: 20-MAY-19

Recovery Manager complete.

Press Enter to continue

Finally, we update the demo log table:

-------------------------------------
Step 3: Updating and viewing demo log
-------------------------------------
Calling 'sqlplus / as sysdba'
To updated and view demo log

1 row created.

Commit complete.

WHEN COMMENTS
------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------
16-MAY-19 05.31.24.000000 PM Enable Archive Log Mode
16-MAY-19 05.40.23.000000 PM Full Backup
16-MAY-19 05.46.17.000000 PM Full Backup plus Archive Logs
17-MAY-19 04.55.12.000000 PM Image Copy
20-MAY-19 05.13.44.000000 PM Incremental Level 0

Press Enter to exit shell script

[oracle@dc1sbxdb001 demo]$
Reference Scripts
  1. 5_incremental_level_0.sh
  2. 5_incremental_level_0.cmd

To download all 2 in one zip: 5_incremental_level_0.zip

The rest of the series
  1. Oracle Database File Placement Best Practice & Create Database Demo
  2. RMAN Full Backup & Demo
  3. RMAN Image Copy & Demo
  4. RMAN Incremental & Demo Part 1 (Level 0)
  5. RMAN Incremental & Demo Part 2 (Level 1)
  6. RMAN Incremental with Block Change Tracking & Demo
  7. RMAN Incremental Differential vs Cumulative & Demo
  8. RMAN Incremental Updating Backup & Demo Part 1
  9. RMAN Incremental Updating Backup & Demo Part 2
  10. Flashback
  11. RMAN Block Media Recovery
  12. RMAN Recover database with only FRA
  13. RMAN Obsolete

Please Note: Links to the blog posts will be released daily and updated here.

 

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

Categories: DBA Blogs

[Solved] RW-50016: Error: – {0} Not Created During EBS R12.1 Installation

Online Apps DBA - Mon, 2019-05-27 06:55

[Solved] RW-50016: Error: – {0} Not Created During EBS R12.1 Installation If you’ve faced the issue while Installing Oracle EBS R12.1 with the bellow RW-50016: Error: – {0} was not created, Then we have got you covered in this blog! Check Troubleshooting at https://k21academy.com/appsdba55 & know 1) What This issue All About? 2) Symptom & […]

The post [Solved] RW-50016: Error: – {0} Not Created During EBS R12.1 Installation appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

How to change Remote Trail Location at Source– Golden Gate 12c

Syed Jaffar - Sun, 2019-05-26 02:29

There is a requirement to modify the remote trail location because of typo in the mount point. To change the remote trail location of the Golden Gate, first verify the extract trail information using the command below. 

GGSCI (hie-p-ggate) 48> INFO EXTTRAIL

       Extract Trail: /golgengate/ggs_home/dirdat/test/ru
        Seqno Length: 6
   Flip Seqno Length: yes
             Extract: DPMP1
               Seqno: 0
                 RBA: 0
           File Size: 500M

       Extract Trail: D:\app\oracle\product\ogg_1\lt
        Seqno Length: 6
   Flip Seqno Length: yes
             Extract: EXT1
               Seqno: 0
                 RBA: 0
           File Size: 100M
GGSCI (hie-p-ggate) 49>

First delete the current configuration of remote trail. 

GGSCI (hie-p-ggate) 50> delete rmttrail /golgengate/ggs_home/dirdat/test/ru, extract dpmp1
Deleting extract trail /golgengate/ggs_home/dirdat/test/ru for extract DPMP1

After removing, then add the remote trail again with the new location. 


GGSCI (hie-p-ggate) 51> add rmttrail /goldengate/ggs_home/dirdat/test/ru, extract dpmp1
RMTTRAIL added.


After deleting and adding now we can see the extract trail for the target with new location. 

GGSCI (hie-p-ggate) 52> INFO EXTTRAIL

       Extract Trail: /goldengate/ggs_home/dirdat/test/ru
        Seqno Length: 6
   Flip Seqno Length: yes
             Extract: DPMP1
               Seqno: 0
                 RBA: 0
           File Size: 500M

       Extract Trail: D:\app\oracle\product\ogg_1\lt
        Seqno Length: 6
   Flip Seqno Length: yes
             Extract: EXT1
               Seqno: 0
                 RBA: 0
           File Size: 100M



GGSCI (hie-p-ggate) 53>


[Blog] Increasing Service Limit in Oracle Cloud (OCI)

Online Apps DBA - Sun, 2019-05-26 02:07

[OCI: Service Limit & How to Increase] When you create a FREE Cloud trial account, Limits are set, meaning you can create only 1-2 Resources/ Service (VM, Load Balancer, etc ) While this is OK when you start but as you deploy business applications like RAC or Dataguard, EBS (R12), Peoplesoft, JD Edwards or HA […]

The post [Blog] Increasing Service Limit in Oracle Cloud (OCI) appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

Configuring Oracle DB data source in JBoss EAP 7.1

Yann Neuhaus - Sun, 2019-05-26 02:05

Introduction

This blog explains how to install and use an Oracle database JDBC driver in JBoss EAP 7.1 standalone instance and in a domain deployment.

Oracle JDBC driver installation
The first step is to install the JDBC driver in the JBoss installation. This can be done copying the files to the right directory or using the JBoss CLI to do the install properly.
I will use the JBoss CLI script for this.

Start the JBoss CLI without connecting to any JBoss instance.

/opt/jboss-eap-7.1/bin/jboss-cli.sh

Then use the module add CLI command to install the Oracle JDBC driver to the right place.

module add --name=com.oracle --resources=/home/pascal/jdbc_drivers/ojdbc8.jar --dependencies=javax.api,javax.transaction.api

This will place the driver in the following directory:

$JBOSS_HOME/modules/com/oracle/main

Note: This CLI command has to be run on each host participating to a domain deployment.
Once the module is installed, it can be use to declare the JDBC driver inside the JBoss instance

Create a Data-Source

For a standalone instance using the default profile:
a. Start jboss_cli.sh to connect to the standalone server and declare the JDBC driver in the Jboss instance

/opt/jboss-eap-7.1/bin/jboss-cli.sh -c --controller=192.168.56.21:9990
[standalone@192.168.56.21:9990 /] /subsystem=datasources/jdbc-driver=oracle:add(driver-name=oracle,driver-module-name=com.oracle,driver-xa-datasource-class-name=oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver)
{"outcome" => "success"}
[standalone@192.168.56.21:9990 /]

b. Confirm the JDBC driver has been declared successfully.

[standalone@192.168.56.21:9990 /] /subsystem=datasources/jdbc-driver=oracle:read-resource
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "deployment-name" => undefined,
        "driver-class-name" => undefined,
        "driver-datasource-class-name" => undefined,
        "driver-major-version" => undefined,
        "driver-minor-version" => undefined,
        "driver-module-name" => "com.oracle",
        "driver-name" => "oracle",
        "driver-xa-datasource-class-name" => "oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver",
        "jdbc-compliant" => undefined,
        "module-slot" => undefined,
        "profile" => undefined,
        "xa-datasource-class" => undefined
    }
}

c. Create the data-source pointing to the Oracle Database

[standalone@192.168.56.21:9990 /] data-source add --name=testOracleDS --jndi-name=java:/jdbc/testOracleDS --driver-name=oracle --connection-url=jdbc:oracle:thin:@vm12:1521/orcl --user-name=scott --password=tiger --jta=true --use-ccm=true --use-java-context=true --enabled=true --user-name=scott --password=tiger --max-pool-size=10 --min-pool-size=5 --flush-strategy="FailingConnectionOnly"

d. Confirm the Datasource creation and parameters.

[standalone@192.168.56.21:9990 /] /subsystem=datasources/data-source=testOracleDS:read-resource
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "allocation-retry" => undefined,
        "allocation-retry-wait-millis" => undefined,
        "allow-multiple-users" => false,
        "authentication-context" => undefined,
        "background-validation" => undefined,
        "background-validation-millis" => undefined,
        "blocking-timeout-wait-millis" => undefined,
        "capacity-decrementer-class" => undefined,
        "capacity-decrementer-properties" => undefined,
        "capacity-incrementer-class" => undefined,
        "capacity-incrementer-properties" => undefined,
        "check-valid-connection-sql" => undefined,
        "connectable" => false,
        "connection-listener-class" => undefined,
        "connection-listener-property" => undefined,
        "connection-url" => "jdbc:oracle:thin:@vm12:1521/orcl",
        "credential-reference" => undefined,
        "datasource-class" => undefined,
        "driver-class" => undefined,
        "driver-name" => "oracle",
        "elytron-enabled" => false,
        "enabled" => true,
        "enlistment-trace" => false,
        "exception-sorter-class-name" => undefined,
        "exception-sorter-properties" => undefined,
        "flush-strategy" => "FailingConnectionOnly",
        "idle-timeout-minutes" => undefined,
        "initial-pool-size" => undefined,
        "jndi-name" => "java:/jdbc/testOracleDS",
        "jta" => true,
        "max-pool-size" => 10,
        "mcp" => "org.jboss.jca.core.connectionmanager.pool.mcp.SemaphoreConcurrentLinkedDequeManagedConnectionPool",
        "min-pool-size" => 5,
        "new-connection-sql" => undefined,
        "password" => "tiger",
        "pool-fair" => undefined,
        "pool-prefill" => undefined,
        "pool-use-strict-min" => undefined,
        "prepared-statements-cache-size" => undefined,
        "query-timeout" => undefined,
        "reauth-plugin-class-name" => undefined,
        "reauth-plugin-properties" => undefined,
        "security-domain" => undefined,
        "set-tx-query-timeout" => false,
        "share-prepared-statements" => false,
        "spy" => false,
        "stale-connection-checker-class-name" => undefined,
        "stale-connection-checker-properties" => undefined,
        "statistics-enabled" => false,
        "track-statements" => "NOWARN",
        "tracking" => false,
        "transaction-isolation" => undefined,
        "url-delimiter" => undefined,
        "url-selector-strategy-class-name" => undefined,
        "use-ccm" => true,
        "use-fast-fail" => false,
        "use-java-context" => true,
        "use-try-lock" => undefined,
        "user-name" => "scott",
        "valid-connection-checker-class-name" => undefined,
        "valid-connection-checker-properties" => undefined,
        "validate-on-match" => undefined,
        "connection-properties" => undefined,
        "statistics" => {
            "jdbc" => undefined,
            "pool" => undefined
        }
    }
}

At this stage, the data-source is available to all applications deployed in the standalone server. I started with the standalone.xml default profile configuration file. To have additional subsystems, an other standalone profile configuration file should be used.
For a JBoss domain using the Full-ha profile
The domain I’m using in my tests is having a domain controller and two slave Hosts running two servers organized in two server groups.
a. Start jboss_cli.sh to connect to the domain master

/opt/jboss-eap-7.1/bin/jboss-cli.sh -c --controller=192.168.56.21:9990

b. Register the Oracle JDBC driver

[domain@192.168.56.21:9990 /] /profile=full-ha/subsystem=datasources/jdbc-driver=oracle:add(driver-name=oracle,driver-module-name=com.oracle,driver-xa-datasource-class-name=oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver)
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => undefined,
    "server-groups" => {"Group2" => {"host" => {
        "host1" => {"server-two" => {"response" => {
            "outcome" => "success",
            "result" => undefined
        }}},
        "host2" => {"server-four" => {"response" => {
            "outcome" => "success",
            "result" => undefined
        }}}
    }}}
}
[domain@192.168.56.21:9990 /]

In the JBoss domain I used for the testing, the full-ha profile has been used when creating the Group2 Servers group.
c. Confirm the JDBC driver has been declared successfully.

[domain@192.168.56.21:9990 /] /profile=full-ha/subsystem=datasources/jdbc-driver=oracle:read-resource
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "deployment-name" => undefined,
        "driver-class-name" => undefined,
        "driver-datasource-class-name" => undefined,
        "driver-major-version" => undefined,
        "driver-minor-version" => undefined,
        "driver-module-name" => "com.oracle",
        "driver-name" => "oracle",
        "driver-xa-datasource-class-name" => "oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver",
        "jdbc-compliant" => undefined,
        "module-slot" => undefined,
        "profile" => undefined,
        "xa-datasource-class" => undefined
    }
}
[domain@192.168.56.21:9990 /]

d. Create the Data source pointing to the Oracle Database

[domain@192.168.56.21:9990 /] data-source add --profile=full-ha --name=testOracleDS --jndi-name=java:/jdbc/testOracleDS --driver-name=oracle --connection-url=jdbc:oracle:thin:@vm12:1521/orcl --user-name=scott --password=tiger --jta=true --use-ccm=true --use-java-context=true --enabled=true --user-name=scott --password=tiger --max-pool-size=10 --min-pool-size=5 --flush-strategy="FailingConnectionOnly"

e. Confirm the data source has been create correctly

[domain@192.168.56.21:9990 /] /profile=full-ha/subsystem=datasources/data-source=testOracleDS:read-resource
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "allocation-retry" => undefined,
        "allocation-retry-wait-millis" => undefined,
        "allow-multiple-users" => false,
        "authentication-context" => undefined,
        "background-validation" => undefined,
        "background-validation-millis" => undefined,
        "blocking-timeout-wait-millis" => undefined,
        "capacity-decrementer-class" => undefined,
        "capacity-decrementer-properties" => undefined,
        "capacity-incrementer-class" => undefined,
        "capacity-incrementer-properties" => undefined,
        "check-valid-connection-sql" => undefined,
        "connectable" => false,
        "connection-listener-class" => undefined,
        "connection-listener-property" => undefined,
        "connection-url" => "jdbc:oracle:thin:@vm12:1521/orcl",
        "credential-reference" => undefined,
        "datasource-class" => undefined,
        "driver-class" => undefined,
        "driver-name" => "oracle",
        "elytron-enabled" => false,
        "enabled" => true,
        "enlistment-trace" => false,
        "exception-sorter-class-name" => undefined,
        "exception-sorter-properties" => undefined,
        "flush-strategy" => "FailingConnectionOnly",
        "idle-timeout-minutes" => undefined,
        "initial-pool-size" => undefined,
        "jndi-name" => "java:/jdbc/testOracleDS",
        "jta" => true,
        "max-pool-size" => 10,
        "mcp" => "org.jboss.jca.core.connectionmanager.pool.mcp.SemaphoreConcurrentLinkedDequeManagedConnectionPool",
        "min-pool-size" => 5,
        "new-connection-sql" => undefined,
        "password" => "tiger",
        "pool-fair" => undefined,
        "pool-prefill" => undefined,
        "pool-use-strict-min" => undefined,
        "prepared-statements-cache-size" => undefined,
        "query-timeout" => undefined,
        "reauth-plugin-class-name" => undefined,
        "reauth-plugin-properties" => undefined,
        "security-domain" => undefined,
        "set-tx-query-timeout" => false,
        "share-prepared-statements" => false,
        "spy" => false,
        "stale-connection-checker-class-name" => undefined,
        "stale-connection-checker-properties" => undefined,
        "statistics-enabled" => false,
        "track-statements" => "NOWARN",
        "tracking" => false,
        "transaction-isolation" => undefined,
        "url-delimiter" => undefined,
        "url-selector-strategy-class-name" => undefined,
        "use-ccm" => true,
        "use-fast-fail" => false,
        "use-java-context" => true,
        "use-try-lock" => undefined,
        "user-name" => "scott",
        "valid-connection-checker-class-name" => undefined,
        "valid-connection-checker-properties" => undefined,
        "validate-on-match" => undefined,
        "connection-properties" => undefined
    }
}
[domain@192.168.56.21:9990 /]

At this stage, all servers in the Server group Group2 have been targeted with the data-source and all applications deployed to those servers can use it.
As the data-source has been targeted to the profile, all server groups created with this profile will allow their JBoss servers instances to use it.

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[Oracle Integration Cloud] Create Instance: Step-by-Step

Online Apps DBA - Sat, 2019-05-25 06:53

[Oracle Integration Cloud] Create Instance to Practice, Step-by-Step! Best way to learn integration on Cloud using ‘Oracle Integration Cloud’ is by doing it on Cloud and for that, you’ll need an Oracle Integration Cloud Instance. You can now create a FREE Trial Cloud Integration Instance Get Step by Step document at https://k21academy.com/oic12 covering, ▪ Two […]

The post [Oracle Integration Cloud] Create Instance: Step-by-Step appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

Oracle JDeveloper: Is this IDE dead? Are there new releases?

Dietrich Schroff - Fri, 2019-05-24 12:22
Some weeks ago i read the Java Magazine (http://www.javamagazine.mozaicreader.com)

They report from a survay taken place in 2018 about Java. One of the questions was which application server do you use in production:

This was not really amazing.
But the question about the IDE gave a really surprising result:



More developers use IntelliJ than Eclipse?
Not really surprising was the usage of Oracle's JDeveloper: Only 1% of the developers use this tool.

You have to keep in mind, that with using Oracle's SOA Suite / BPEL / ESB you are forced to use JDeveloper - which means this SOA stuff is not used by many people out there.

If you take a look on the Oracle homepage you will find:


The last version was released in august 2017 - this does look like living software.

For architects and consultants JDeveloper can be very useful because it has a very nice visualization of XSDs and XSLTs (Take a look here). So hopefully JDeveloper will stay alive...

RMAN Image Copy & Demo

Zed DBA's Oracle Blog - Fri, 2019-05-24 09:38

This blog post is part of the “RMAN Back to Basics” series, which can be found here.

Image Copy

An Image copy backup are exact copies of the datafiles including the free space.  They are not stored in RMAN backup pieces but as actual datafiles, therefore are a bit-for-bit copy.

Image Copy Demo

We take an image copy backup using my script 4_image_copy.sh:

[oracle@dc1sbxdb001 demo]$ ./4_image_copy.sh 
-----------------------
Step 1: Set environment
-----------------------

Setting the Database Environment using oraenv...
The Oracle base remains unchanged with value /u01/app/oracle

ORACLE_SID: ZEDDBA
ORACLE_HOME: /u01/app/oracle/product/12.2.0/dbhome_1

Press Enter to continue

The environment is set to my ZEDDBA database, then next the image copy is taken:

------------------------------
Step 2: Take Image Copy Backup
------------------------------

Cotent of 4_image_copy.cmd file:

BACKUP AS COPY DATABASE TAG 'IMAGE COPY';
HOST 'read Press Enter to LIST BACKUP';
LIST COPY;

Press Enter to continue

Calling 'rman target / cmdfile=/media/sf_Software/scripts/demo/4_image_copy.cmd'

Recovery Manager: Release 12.2.0.1.0 - Production on Fri May 17 16:54:31 2019

Copyright (c) 1982, 2017, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

connected to target database: ZEDDBA (DBID=3520942925)

RMAN> BACKUP AS COPY DATABASE TAG 'IMAGE COPY';
2> HOST 'read Press Enter to LIST BACKUP';
3> LIST COPY;
4> 
Starting backup at 17-MAY-19
using target database control file instead of recovery catalog
allocated channel: ORA_DISK_1
channel ORA_DISK_1: SID=32 device type=DISK
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting datafile copy
input datafile file number=00001 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gftkr3fv_.dbf
output file name=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gfxp9txc_.dbf tag=IMAGE COPY RECID=1 STAMP=1008521678
channel ORA_DISK_1: datafile copy complete, elapsed time: 00:00:07
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting datafile copy
input datafile file number=00002 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gftkr792_.dbf
output file name=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gfxpb246_.dbf tag=IMAGE COPY RECID=2 STAMP=1008521685
channel ORA_DISK_1: datafile copy complete, elapsed time: 00:00:07
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting datafile copy
input datafile file number=00003 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gftkr944_.dbf
output file name=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gfxpb9b0_.dbf tag=IMAGE COPY RECID=3 STAMP=1008521691
channel ORA_DISK_1: datafile copy complete, elapsed time: 00:00:03
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting datafile copy
input datafile file number=00004 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gftkr9fc_.dbf
output file name=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gfxpbdgo_.dbf tag=IMAGE COPY RECID=4 STAMP=1008521693
channel ORA_DISK_1: datafile copy complete, elapsed time: 00:00:01
Finished backup at 17-MAY-19

Starting Control File and SPFILE Autobackup at 17-MAY-19
piece handle=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_17/o1_mf_s_1008521693_gfxpbfs7_.bkp comment=NONE
Finished Control File and SPFILE Autobackup at 17-MAY-19

host command complete

We use host within RMAN just to wait for input before moving on for demo purposes.  Next we list the backup within RMAN using ‘LIST COPY‘:

specification does not match any control file copy in the repository
List of Datafile Copies
=======================

Key File S Completion Time Ckp SCN Ckp Time Sparse
------- ---- - --------------- ---------- --------------- ------
1 1 A 17-MAY-19 458020 17-MAY-19 NO 
Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gfxp9txc_.dbf
Tag: IMAGE COPY

2 2 A 17-MAY-19 458023 17-MAY-19 NO 
Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gfxpb246_.dbf
Tag: IMAGE COPY

3 3 A 17-MAY-19 458027 17-MAY-19 NO 
Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gfxpb9b0_.dbf
Tag: IMAGE COPY

4 4 A 17-MAY-19 458029 17-MAY-19 NO 
Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gfxpbdgo_.dbf
Tag: IMAGE COPY

List of Archived Log Copies for database with db_unique_name ZEDDBA
=====================================================================

Key Thrd Seq S Low Time 
------- ---- ------- - ---------
3 1 15 A 16-MAY-19
Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/archivelog/2019_05_17/o1_mf_1_15_gfxp940y_.arc

Recovery Manager complete.

Press Enter to continue

Finally, we update the demo log table:

-------------------------------------
Step 3: Updating and viewing demo log
-------------------------------------
Calling 'sqlplus / as sysdba'
To updated and view demo log

1 row created.

Commit complete.

WHEN COMMENTS
------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------
16-MAY-19 05.31.24.000000 PM Enable Archive Log Mode
16-MAY-19 05.40.23.000000 PM Full Backup
16-MAY-19 05.46.17.000000 PM Full Backup plus Archive Logs
17-MAY-19 04.55.12.000000 PM Image Copy

Press Enter to exit shell script

[oracle@dc1sbxdb001 demo]$
Reference Scripts
  1. 4_image_copy.sh
  2. 4_image_copy.cmd

To download all 2 in one zip: 4_image_copy.zip

The rest of the series
  1. Oracle Database File Placement Best Practice & Create Database Demo
  2. RMAN Full Backup & Demo
  3. RMAN Image Copy & Demo
  4. RMAN Incremental & Demo Part 1 (Level 0)
  5. RMAN Incremental & Demo Part 2 (Level 1)
  6. RMAN Incremental with Block Change Tracking & Demo
  7. RMAN Incremental Differential vs Cumulative & Demo
  8. RMAN Incremental Updating Backup & Demo Part 1
  9. RMAN Incremental Updating Backup & Demo Part 2
  10. Flashback
  11. RMAN Block Media Recovery
  12. RMAN Recover database with only FRA
  13. RMAN Obsolete

Please Note: Links to the blog posts will be released daily and updated here.

 

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

Categories: DBA Blogs

[Solved] EBS R12.2: TNS-12560: TNS:protocol adapter error, TNS-00584: Valid node checking configuration error

Online Apps DBA - Fri, 2019-05-24 06:59

[Solved] EBS R12.2: TNS-12560: TNS: protocol adapter error, TNS-00584: Valid node checking configuration error Are you an Apps DBA and have encountered with TNS: protocol adapter error, TNS-00584 & searching for the Solution? Then our New Blog Post at https://k21academy.com/appsdba56 can help you to figure out: ✔ What is this Issue, that occurs while starting […]

The post [Solved] EBS R12.2: TNS-12560: TNS:protocol adapter error, TNS-00584: Valid node checking configuration error appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

Re-partitioning – 18

Jonathan Lewis - Fri, 2019-05-24 06:50

In yesterday’s note on the options for converting a range-partioned table into a composite range/list parititioned table I mentioned that you could do this online with a single command in 18c, so here’s some demonstration code to demonstrate that claim:


rem
rem     Script:         pt_comp_from_pt_18.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          May 2019
rem

create table pt_range (
        id              number(8,0)     not null,
        grp             varchar2(1)     not null,
        small_vc        varchar2(10),
        padding         varchar2(100)
)
partition by range(id) (
        partition p200 values less than (200),
        partition p400 values less than (400),
        partition p600 values less than (600)
)
;

insert into pt_range
select
        rownum - 1,
        mod(rownum,2),
        lpad(rownum,10,'0'),
        rpad('x',100,'x')
from
        all_objects
where
        rownum <= 600 -- > comment to avoid WordPress format issue
;

commit;

alter table pt_range modify
partition by range(id) interval (200)
subpartition by list (grp) 
subpartition template (
        subpartition p_0 values (0),
        subpartition p_1 values (1),
        subpartition p_2 values (2),
        subpartition p_def values (default)
)
(
        partition p200 values less than (200)
)
-- online
;

execute dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(null, 'pt_range', granularity=>'all')

break on partition_name skip 1

select  partition_name, subpartition_name, num_rows 
from    user_tab_subpartitions 
where   table_name = 'PT_RANGE'
order by
        partition_name, subpartition_name
;

Run this (with or without the online option) and you’ll (probably) see the Oracle error “ORA-00604: error occurred at recursive SQL level 1” with one of two underlying errors:

    ORA-01950: no privileges on tablespace 'SYSTEM'
    ORA-01536: space quota exceeded for tablespace 'SYSTEM'

So what’s gone wrong – it ought to work.

After enabling a 10046 trace I repeated the “alter table” command then scanned the trace file for the text “err=1950” (that being the error I’d received on my first attempt) and scanned backwards for the “PARSING IN CURSOR” line with a matching cursor id:


ERROR #139721552722200:err=1950 tim=26541227462

PARSING IN CURSOR #139721552722200 len=182 dep=1 uid=104 oct=1 lid=0 tim=26541224560 hv=2451601965 ad='7f1377267890' sqlid='0wsjfgk920yjd'
create table  "TEST_USER"."SYS_RMTAB$$_H124028"  ( src_rowid rowid not null , tgt_rowid rowid not null) 
    segment creation immediate nologging 
    tablespace  "SYSTEM"  
    rowid_mapping_table
END OF STMT

The code is trying to create a “rowid_mapping_table” in the system tablespace and I have no quota for the tablespace. (The 124028 in the table name relates to the object_id of the table I was trying to modify, by the way.)

The source of the error offered a big clue about a possible workaround sp I gave myself a quota (unlimited) on the system tablespace (alter user test_user quota unlimited on system) and that made it possible for the restructuring to take place. It’s not really an appropriate workaround for a production system though – especially if you’re using the online option and the table is subject to a lot of change.  (Note – this “rowid_mapping_table” and a “journal” table are created even if you haven’t selected the online option.)

Footnotes
  • The problem has been fixed in 19c (tested on LiveSQL)  and is listed on MoS as Bug 27580976 : INTERNAL RECURSIVE MAPPING TABLE MISTAKENLY PLACE IN SYSTEM FOR ONLINE OPS. There are no patches for 18c at present.
  • After I’d finished testing the quota workaround I tried to deprive myself of the quota on the system tablespace. I may have missed something in the manuals but it looks like the only way to do this is to give myself a zero quota (or, as I have done occasionally in the past, drop user cascade) because there’s no option for “quota denied” or “revoke quota” . This is why you may get one of two different messages after the ORA-00604. If you’ve never had a quota on the system tablespace you’ll get the “ORA-1950: no privileges” message, if you’ve had a quota at some time in the pasat and then had it set to zero’ you’ll get the “ORA-01536: space quota exceeded” message.

 

Latest Blog Posts by Oracle ACE Associates - May 5-11, 2019

OTN TechBlog - Fri, 2019-05-24 05:00
Magic Beans?

This is the last of three posts that list blog posts published by members of the Oracle ACE Program, May 5-11, 2019. Normally I publish the complete list of all posts by ACE Program members during a given week. But during that particular week these folks must have been hyper-caffeinated or revved up on particularly effective nutritional supplements. Whatever the cause, they generated an unusually large number of posts -- more than 70 in a single week. Whatever it takes!

 

Oracle ACE Associate Alfredo AbateAlfredo Abate
Senior Oracle Systems Architect, Brake Parts Inc LLC
McHenry, Illinois

 

Oracle ACE Associate Omar ShubeilatOmar Shubeilat
Cloud Solution Architect EPM, PrimeQ (ANZ)
Sydney, Australia

 

Oracle ACE Associate Robin ChatterjeeRobin Chatterjee
Head of Oracle Exadata Centre of Excellence, Tata Consultancy Services
Kolkata, India

 

Sandra Flores
Arquitecto de soluciones, DevX MX
Mexico City, Mexico

 

Oracle ACE Simo VilmunenSimo Vilmunen
Technical Architect, Uponor
Toronto, Canada

 
Additional Resources

Demo: GraphQL with Oracle Database SODA and node-oracledb

Christopher Jones - Fri, 2019-05-24 02:18

This is a GraphQL demo that stores data in an Oracle Database SODA collection. GraphQL is a query language for services. Oracle Database SODA is a NoSQL-like API for storing documents in Oracle Database. The demo follows on from my previous "Demo: GraphQL with Oracle Database and node-oracledb" which shows the same demonstration using relational tables and SQL queries. Read that post to learn about GraphQL and GraphQL queries. Also see the associated SODA presentation Getting Started with GraphQL APIs on Oracle Database with Node.js which shows some SODA features.

Demo prerequisites:

  • Oracle Database 18.3, or later

  • Oracle Client libraries 18.5 or 19.5, or later

Steps to run the demo:

  1. Download the source code from here and extract it with tar -xf graphql_oracle_soda.tgz

  2. Change to the graphql_oracle_soda directory, edit dbconfig.js and set your database schema credentials.

  3. Run npm install. This will install dependencies and run setup.js to create the SODA schema.

  4. Run npm start to start the GraphQL server.

  5. Load the URL http://localhost:3000/graphql

  6. In the browser, execute GraphQL requests shown in SAMPLE_QUERIES.txt

Since my previous blog discussed the behavior of the GraphQL inputs and outputs, let's look at the SODA implementation. In setup.js a collection is created:

const sodaCollectionName = "myBlogs"; let collection = await soda.openCollection(sodaCollectionName);

This method will actually open the collection if it already exists, so the next commands drop the collection so the demo can recreate it and run with a known, clean collection:

collection.drop(); await conn.execute(`begin execute immediate 'drop sequence "mySequence"'; exception when others then if sqlcode <> -2289 then raise; end if; end;`);

The cleanup is in two parts because the collection that will be created uses a sequence for the document keys. While SODA will auto-create the sequence, the collection.drop() method doesn't automatically drop the created sequence.

The collection is then created using custom metadata:

const metaData = { "schemaName": config.user.toUpperCase(), "tableName": "myBlogs", "keyColumn": { "name": "ID", "assignmentMethod": "SEQUENCE", "sequenceName": "mySequence" }, "contentColumn": { "name": "JSON_DOCUMENT", "sqlType": "BLOB", "compress": "NONE", "cache": true, "encrypt": "NONE", "validation": "STANDARD" }, "versionColumn": { "name": "VERSION", "method": "SHA256" }, "lastModifiedColumn": { "name": "LAST_MODIFIED" }, "creationTimeColumn": { "name": "CREATED_ON" }, "readOnly": false}; collection = await soda.createCollection(sodaCollectionName, {metaData: metaData});

I only needed to specify the metadata because I wanted to change the default key generation from a SHA hash to be a sequence, to align with GraphQL's use of integers for identifiers.

The final part of the setup is creation of a couple of documents in the collection:

await collection.insertOne({"title": "Blog Title 1", "content": "This is blog 1"}); await collection.insertOne({"title": "Blog Title 2", "content": "This is blog 2"});

I could have done all the setup in a SQL file, but decided to be more Node.js-centric in this particular demo.

Let's look at the GraphQL code in graphql_oracle_soda.js. The GraphQL typedefs and resolvers are the same as the previous SQL example - as is the output from running the demo. The updated helpers that interact with the database are the interesting parts.

In the new SODA example, the helper to get one document aka blog is:

async function getOneBlogHelper(id) { let conn = await oracledb.getConnection(); let soda = conn.getSodaDatabase(); let collection = await soda.openCollection(sodaCollectionName); let document = await collection.find().key(id.toString()).getOne(); let j = null; if (document) { let c = document.getContent(); j = {id: id, title: c.title, content: c.content}; } await conn.close(); return j; }

The SODA filter find() is used to find the SODA document with the requested id. The document content is extracted with getConection() and the document values are mapped to a JavaScript object returned back up via the GraphQL resolver. The other helpers are similarly straightforward.

This simple demo shows how to use some of Oracle's exciting SODA features. SODA APIs are available in a number of languages including Java and Python, letting you access your stored data from familar environments. If you do interesting things with SODA, let us know.

Latest Blog Posts by Oracle ACEs - May 5-11, 2019

OTN TechBlog - Thu, 2019-05-23 11:20
Skills on display...

As I explained in Tuesday's blog post, members of the Oracle ACE Program were extraordinarily busy blogging the week of May 5-11, 2019, so much so that I've had to break the list of the latest posts into separate lists for the three levels in the program: ACE Directors , ACEs , and ACE Associates . Tuesday's post featured the ACE Director posts. Today it's the ACE's turn. Posts from ACE Associates will soon follow.

 

Oracle ACE Anoop JohnyAnoop Johny
Senior Developer, Wesfarmers Chemicals, Energy & Fertilisers
Perth, Australia

Oracle ACE Anton ElsAnton Els
VP Engineering, Dbvisit Software Limited
Auckland, New Zealand

 

Oracle ACE Atul KUmarAtul Kumar
Founder & CTO, K21 Academy
London, United Kingdom

 

Oracle ACE Jhonata LamimJhonata Lamim
Senior Oracle Consultant, Exímio IT Solutions
Brusque, Brazil

 

Oracle ACE Kyle GoodfriendKyle Goodfriend
Vice President, Planning & Analytics, Accelytics Inc.
Columbus, Ohio

 

Oracle ACE Laurent LeturgezLaurent Leturgez
President/CTO, Premiseo
Lille, France

 

Oracle ACE Marcelo OchoaMarcelo Ochoa
System Lab Manager, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas - UNICEN
Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

Oracle ACE Marko MischkeMarco Mischke
Group Lead, Database Projects, Robotron Datenbank-Software GmbH
Dresden.Germany

 

Oracle ACE Martin BergerMartin Berger
Database Teamleader, Hutchison Drei Austria GmbH
Vienna, Austria

 

Oracle ACE Miguel PalaciosMiguel Palacios
Gerente General, Global Business Solutions Perú
Peru

 

Oracle ACE Peter ScottPeter Scott
Principal/Owner, Sandwich Analytics
Marcillé-la-Ville, France

 

Oracle ACE Rodrigo MufalaniRodrigo Mufalani
Principal Database Architect, eProseed
Luxembourg

 

Oracle ACE Rodrigo DeSouzaRodrigo De Souza
Solutions Architect, Innive Inc.
Tampa, Florida

 

 

Additional Resources

RMAN Full Backup & Demo

Zed DBA's Oracle Blog - Thu, 2019-05-23 09:13

This blog post is part of the “RMAN Back to Basics” series, which can be found here.

Full Backup

A full backup is a backup of all the database’s data which excludes free space and stores in RMAN backup pieces.  For example, if you have a newly created database with datafiles added that initial size of 10GB, the 10GB from each datafiles is mainly just free space and hence RMAN does not backup the free space, thus space efficient.

Archive Log Mode

When DML (Data Manipulation Language) is ran against a database, this is stored in online redo logs, so Oracle can reply DML in case of crash recovery to ensure database is consistent and that all committed data is present.  Online redo logs fill up and Oracle move onto the next group till reaches the last one and then go back to the first one, but in order to maintain the redo, Oracle “archive” the online redo log to archive logs, hence the word “archive”.

Archive redo logs along with online redo logs are required to recovery a database after a restored, because if the database is open it’s a moving target and the DML will need to be replayed so the the first and last datafile that were backups are consistent i.e. at the same point (SCN) if doing incomplete recovery.  Complete recovery is when all the archive redo logs and then online redo logs are applied, taking the database to the current SCN before the restore was done i.e. no data loss.

Demos Enable Archive Log Mode

Before we can take a full backup we need to enable archive log mode using my script 1_enable_archive_log_mode.sh:

[oracle@dc1sbxdb001 demo]$ ./1_enable_archive_log_mode.sh
-----------------------
Step 1: Set environment
-----------------------

Setting the Database Environment using oraenv...
The Oracle base has been set to /u01/app/oracle

ORACLE_SID: ZEDDBA
ORACLE_HOME: /u01/app/oracle/product/12.2.0/dbhome_1

Press Enter to continue

The environment is set to my ZEDDBA database, then next a table table is created to log each demo as they run in the table:

-----------------------------
Step 2: Create demo log table
-----------------------------

Content of 1_create_demo_table.sql file:

create table demo_log (when timestamp, comments varchar2(200));
exit

Press Enter to continue

Calling 'sqlplus / as sysdba @1_create_demo_table.sql'

Table created.

Press Enter to continue

Next we enable archive log mode:

-------------------------------
Step 3: Enable Archive Log Mode
-------------------------------

Content of 1_enable_archive_log_mode.sql file:

alter system set db_recovery_file_dest_size = 15G;
shutdown immediate;
startup mount;
alter database archivelog;
alter database open;
insert into demo_log values (sysdate, 'Enable Archive Log Mode');
commit;
@/media/sf_Software/scripts/demo/demo_log.sql
exit

Press Enter to continue

Calling 'sqlplus / as sysdba @1_enable_archive_log_mode.sql'

System altered.

Database closed.
Database dismounted.
ORACLE instance shut down.
ORACLE instance started.

Total System Global Area 2952790016 bytes
Fixed Size 8625080 bytes
Variable Size 1677722696 bytes
Database Buffers 1258291200 bytes
Redo Buffers 8151040 bytes
Database mounted.

Database altered.

Database altered.

1 row created.

Commit complete.

WHEN COMMENTS
------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------
16-MAY-19 05.31.24.000000 PM Enable Archive Log Mode

Press Enter to exit shell script

[oracle@dc1sbxdb001 demo]$
Full Database Backup

We take a full backup using my script 2_full_backup.sh:

[oracle@dc1sbxdb001 demo]$ ./2_full_backup.sh 
-----------------------
Step 1: Set environment
-----------------------

Setting the Database Environment using oraenv...
The Oracle base has been set to /u01/app/oracle

ORACLE_SID: ZEDDBA
ORACLE_HOME: /u01/app/oracle/product/12.2.0/dbhome_1

Press Enter to continue

The environment is set to my ZEDDBA database, then next the full backup is taken:

------------------------
Step 2: Take Full Backup
------------------------

Cotent of 2_full_backup.cmd file:

BACKUP DATABASE TAG 'FULL BACKUP';
HOST 'read Press Enter to LIST BACKUP';
LIST BACKUP;

Press Enter to continue

Calling 'rman target / cmdfile=/media/sf_Software/scripts/demo/2_full_backup.cmd'

Recovery Manager: Release 12.2.0.1.0 - Production on Thu May 16 17:38:52 2019

Copyright (c) 1982, 2017, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

connected to target database: ZEDDBA (DBID=3520942925)

RMAN> BACKUP DATABASE TAG 'FULL BACKUP';
2> HOST 'read Press Enter to LIST BACKUP';
3> LIST BACKUP;
4> 
Starting backup at 16-MAY-19
using target database control file instead of recovery catalog
allocated channel: ORA_DISK_1
channel ORA_DISK_1: SID=149 device type=DISK
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting full datafile backup set
channel ORA_DISK_1: specifying datafile(s) in backup set
input datafile file number=00001 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gftkr3fv_.dbf
input datafile file number=00002 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gftkr792_.dbf
input datafile file number=00003 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gftkr944_.dbf
input datafile file number=00004 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gftkr9fc_.dbf
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting piece 1 at 16-MAY-19
channel ORA_DISK_1: finished piece 1 at 16-MAY-19
piece handle=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_nnndf_FULL_BACKUP_gfv4k119_.bkp tag=FULL BACKUP comment=NONE
channel ORA_DISK_1: backup set complete, elapsed time: 00:00:15
Finished backup at 16-MAY-19

Starting Control File and SPFILE Autobackup at 16-MAY-19
piece handle=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_16/o1_mf_s_1008437952_gfv4kjko_.bkp comment=NONE
Finished Control File and SPFILE Autobackup at 16-MAY-19

host command complete

We use host within RMAN just to wait for input before moving on.  Next we list the backup within RMAN using ‘LIST BACKUP‘:

List of Backup Sets
===================

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
1 Full 498.93M DISK 00:00:08 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 1 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: FULL BACKUP
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_nnndf_FULL_BACKUP_gfv4k119_.bkp
List of Datafiles in backup set 1
File LV Type Ckp SCN Ckp Time Abs Fuz SCN Sparse Name
---- -- ---- ---------- --------- ----------- ------ ----
1 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gftkr3fv_.dbf
2 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gftkr792_.dbf
3 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gftkr944_.dbf
4 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gftkr9fc_.dbf

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
2 Full 8.31M DISK 00:00:00 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 2 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: TAG20190516T173912
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_16/o1_mf_s_1008437952_gfv4kjko_.bkp
SPFILE Included: Modification time: 16-MAY-19
SPFILE db_unique_name: ZEDDBA
Control File Included: Ckp SCN: 353836 Ckp time: 16-MAY-19

Recovery Manager complete.

Press Enter to continue

Finally, we update the demo log table:

-------------------------------------
Step 3: Updating and viewing demo log
-------------------------------------
Calling 'sqlplus / as sysdba'
To updated and view demo log

1 row created.

Commit complete.

WHEN COMMENTS
------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------
16-MAY-19 05.31.24.000000 PM Enable Archive Log Mode
16-MAY-19 05.40.23.000000 PM Full Backup

Press Enter to exit shell script

[oracle@dc1sbxdb001 demo]$
Full Database Backup with Archive Logs

We take a full backup with archive logs using my script 3_full_backup_plus_archivelogs.sh:

[oracle@dc1sbxdb001 demo]$ ./3_full_backup_plus_archivelogs.sh
-----------------------
Step 1: Set environment
-----------------------

Setting the Database Environment using oraenv...
The Oracle base has been set to /u01/app/oracle

ORACLE_SID: ZEDDBA
ORACLE_HOME: /u01/app/oracle/product/12.2.0/dbhome_1

Press Enter to continue

The environment is set to my ZEDDBA database, then next the full backup with archive logs is taken:

----------------------------------------
Step 2: Take Full Backup plus archivelog
----------------------------------------

Content of 3_full_backup_plus_archivelogs.cmd file:

BACKUP DATABASE PLUS ARCHIVELOG DELETE INPUT TAG 'FULL BACKUP PLUS ARCHIVELOG';
HOST 'read Press Enter to LIST BACKUP';
LIST BACKUP;

Press Enter to continue

Calling 'rman target / cmdfile=/media/sf_Software/scripts/demo/3_full_backup_plus_archivelogs.cmd'

Recovery Manager: Release 12.2.0.1.0 - Production on Thu May 16 17:45:54 2019

Copyright (c) 1982, 2017, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

connected to target database: ZEDDBA (DBID=3520942925)

RMAN> BACKUP DATABASE PLUS ARCHIVELOG DELETE INPUT TAG 'FULL BACKUP PLUS ARCHIVELOG';
2> HOST 'read Press Enter to LIST BACKUP';
3> LIST BACKUP;
4>

Starting backup at 16-MAY-19
current log archived
using target database control file instead of recovery catalog
allocated channel: ORA_DISK_1
channel ORA_DISK_1: SID=158 device type=DISK
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting archived log backup set
channel ORA_DISK_1: specifying archived log(s) in backup set
input archived log thread=1 sequence=13 RECID=1 STAMP=1008438357
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting piece 1 at 16-MAY-19
channel ORA_DISK_1: finished piece 1 at 16-MAY-19
piece handle=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_annnn_FULL_BACKUP_PLUS_ARC_gfv4y7m2_.bkp tag=FULL BACKUP PLUS ARCHIVELOG comment=NONE
channel ORA_DISK_1: backup set complete, elapsed time: 00:00:03
channel ORA_DISK_1: deleting archived log(s)
archived log file name=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/archivelog/2019_05_16/o1_mf_1_13_gfv4y4mk_.arc RECID=1 STAMP=1008438357
Finished backup at 16-MAY-19

Starting backup at 16-MAY-19
using channel ORA_DISK_1
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting full datafile backup set
channel ORA_DISK_1: specifying datafile(s) in backup set
input datafile file number=00001 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gftkr3fv_.dbf
input datafile file number=00002 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gftkr792_.dbf
input datafile file number=00003 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gftkr944_.dbf
input datafile file number=00004 name=/u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gftkr9fc_.dbf
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting piece 1 at 16-MAY-19
channel ORA_DISK_1: finished piece 1 at 16-MAY-19
piece handle=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_nnndf_TAG20190516T174603_gfv4yco3_.bkp tag=TAG20190516T174603 comment=NONE
channel ORA_DISK_1: backup set complete, elapsed time: 00:00:07
Finished backup at 16-MAY-19

Starting backup at 16-MAY-19
current log archived
using channel ORA_DISK_1
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting archived log backup set
channel ORA_DISK_1: specifying archived log(s) in backup set
input archived log thread=1 sequence=14 RECID=2 STAMP=1008438370
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting piece 1 at 16-MAY-19
channel ORA_DISK_1: finished piece 1 at 16-MAY-19
piece handle=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_annnn_FULL_BACKUP_PLUS_ARC_gfv4ym4v_.bkp tag=FULL BACKUP PLUS ARCHIVELOG comment=NONE
channel ORA_DISK_1: backup set complete, elapsed time: 00:00:01
channel ORA_DISK_1: deleting archived log(s)
archived log file name=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/archivelog/2019_05_16/o1_mf_1_14_gfv4ylo5_.arc RECID=2 STAMP=1008438370
Finished backup at 16-MAY-19

Starting Control File and SPFILE Autobackup at 16-MAY-19
piece handle=/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_16/o1_mf_s_1008438372_gfv4ynmv_.bkp comment=NONE
Finished Control File and SPFILE Autobackup at 16-MAY-19

host command complete

We use host within RMAN just to wait for input before moving on for demo purposes.  Next we list the backup within RMAN using ‘LIST BACKUP‘:

List of Backup Sets
===================

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
1 Full 498.93M DISK 00:00:08 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 1 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: FULL BACKUP
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_nnndf_FULL_BACKUP_gfv4k119_.bkp
List of Datafiles in backup set 1
File LV Type Ckp SCN Ckp Time Abs Fuz SCN Sparse Name
---- -- ---- ---------- --------- ----------- ------ ----
1 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gftkr3fv_.dbf
2 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gftkr792_.dbf
3 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gftkr944_.dbf
4 Full 353825 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gftkr9fc_.dbf

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
2 Full 8.31M DISK 00:00:00 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 2 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: TAG20190516T173912
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_16/o1_mf_s_1008437952_gfv4kjko_.bkp
SPFILE Included: Modification time: 16-MAY-19
SPFILE db_unique_name: ZEDDBA
Control File Included: Ckp SCN: 353836 Ckp time: 16-MAY-19

BS Key Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
3 77.83M DISK 00:00:01 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 3 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: FULL BACKUP PLUS ARCHIVELOG
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_annnn_FULL_BACKUP_PLUS_ARC_gfv4y7m2_.bkp

List of Archived Logs in backup set 3
Thrd Seq Low SCN Low Time Next SCN Next Time
---- ------- ---------- --------- ---------- ---------
1 13 332298 16-MAY-19 354044 16-MAY-19

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
4 Full 498.94M DISK 00:00:06 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 4 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: TAG20190516T174603
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_nnndf_TAG20190516T174603_gfv4yco3_.bkp
List of Datafiles in backup set 4
File LV Type Ckp SCN Ckp Time Abs Fuz SCN Sparse Name
---- -- ---- ---------- --------- ----------- ------ ----
1 Full 354058 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_system_gftkr3fv_.dbf
2 Full 354058 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_sysaux_gftkr792_.dbf
3 Full 354058 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_gftkr944_.dbf
4 Full 354058 16-MAY-19 NO /u01/app/oracle/oradata/ZEDDBA/datafile/o1_mf_users_gftkr9fc_.dbf

BS Key Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
5 3.50K DISK 00:00:00 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 5 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: FULL BACKUP PLUS ARCHIVELOG
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/backupset/2019_05_16/o1_mf_annnn_FULL_BACKUP_PLUS_ARC_gfv4ym4v_.bkp

List of Archived Logs in backup set 5
Thrd Seq Low SCN Low Time Next SCN Next Time
---- ------- ---------- --------- ---------- ---------
1 14 354044 16-MAY-19 354066 16-MAY-19

BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
6 Full 8.31M DISK 00:00:00 16-MAY-19 
BP Key: 6 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: TAG20190516T174612
Piece Name: /u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/ZEDDBA/autobackup/2019_05_16/o1_mf_s_1008438372_gfv4ynmv_.bkp
SPFILE Included: Modification time: 16-MAY-19
SPFILE db_unique_name: ZEDDBA
Control File Included: Ckp SCN: 354077 Ckp time: 16-MAY-19

Recovery Manager complete.

Press Enter to continue

Finally, we update the demo log table:

-------------------------------------
Step 3: Updating and viewing demo log
-------------------------------------
Calling 'sqlplus / as sysdba'
To updated and view demo log

1 row created.

Commit complete.

WHEN COMMENTS
------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------
16-MAY-19 05.31.24.000000 PM Enable Archive Log Mode
16-MAY-19 05.40.23.000000 PM Full Backup
16-MAY-19 05.46.17.000000 PM Full Backup plus Archive Logs

Press Enter to exit shell script

[oracle@dc1sbxdb001 demo]$
Reference Scripts
  1. 1_enable_archive_log_mode.sh
  2. 1_enable_archive_log_mode.sql
  3. 1_create_demo_table.sql
  4. 2_full_backup.sh
  5. 2_full_backup.cmd
  6. 3_full_backup_plus_archivelogs.sh
  7. 3_full_backup_plus_archivelogs.cmd

To download all 7 in one zip: 1_full_backup.zip

The rest of the series
  1. Oracle Database File Placement Best Practice & Create Database Demo
  2. RMAN Full Backup & Demo
  3. RMAN Image Copy & Demo
  4. RMAN Incremental & Demo Part 1 (Level 0)
  5. RMAN Incremental & Demo Part 2 (Level 1)
  6. RMAN Incremental with Block Change Tracking & Demo
  7. RMAN Incremental Differential vs Cumulative & Demo
  8. RMAN Incremental Updating Backup & Demo Part 1
  9. RMAN Incremental Updating Backup & Demo Part 2
  10. Flashback
  11. RMAN Block Media Recovery
  12. RMAN Recover database with only FRA
  13. RMAN Obsolete

Please Note: Links to the blog posts will be released daily and updated here.

 

If you found this blog post useful, please like as well as follow me through my various Social Media avenues available on the sidebar and/or subscribe to this oracle blog via WordPress/e-mail.

Thanks

Zed DBA (Zahid Anwar)

Categories: DBA Blogs

Oracle Merchandising Solution Tops Shopping List for Bosnian Grocers

Oracle Press Releases - Thu, 2019-05-23 07:00
Press Release
Oracle Merchandising Solution Tops Shopping List for Bosnian Grocers Retail brands Konzum and Mercator gain operational agility with modern retail technology

Redwood Shores Calif—May 23, 2019

When customers enter a Mercator or Konzum supermarket, they discover a plethora of organic products, fresh chopped salads, and meat ripening chambers intermingled with everyday grocery needs. The dominant grocery brands in Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) employ a visual standard and layout that maximizes the display of products across various segments. By upgrading to the latest release of Oracle Retail, the trading department can automate the merchandising process and offer guided best practice to associates, allowing them to focus on strategic tasks that impact the bottom line and improve daily operational efficiency.

“The common user interface of our new retail merchandising system (RMS) simplifies the day to day activities while allowing for flexibility where the business demands it. Once our buyers got the hang of the new system we began to see a marked improvement in the speed and efficiency in which they could get their daily, previously tedious, tasks completed,” said Željka Mujezinović, IT manager, Mercator BH d.o.o. (B&H). The Mercator relationship with Oracle began in 2017.

“With the time saved they can spend more time on higher-value tasks and focusing on optimizing our merchandising strategy,” said Džemal Vejsil, IT manager, Konzum d.o.o. (B&H). The Konzum relationship began in 2016.

In the recent Topography of Retail Report, nearly 6,400 European consumers surveyed prioritized competitive pricing and general promotions (78 percent) as one of the most compelling attributes of shopping experience. With Oracle Retail Merchandising, Konzum and Mercator BH buyers will be able to implement differential pricing strategies and multi-buy and transaction promotions easily and pass those savings on to customers. In the future, consumers can take advantage of multi-buy transactions where the more you buy, the more you save. The buyers will be able to evaluate new promotion options to ensure more consistent pricing levels for store shoppers.  

“Retailers need a world-class, modern platform and the ability to interact across all areas of the organization seamlessly. We believe that every retail process should start and end with analytics and business intelligence. Oracle collaborated with 50 retailers, such as Mercator BH and Konzum, to rewrite our merchandising solution and establish the persona and correlated activities to drive operational agility and better business insights,” said Mike Webster, senior vice president and general manager, Oracle Retail.

“We had mStart consultants and customer team members working closely with Oracle on this project. We aligned across the Trading and Purchasing departments to avoid disruption to the business, resulting in the implementation being completed on-time and on-budget for the customer in January 2019,” said Želimira Ivček, Director of Oracle Retail Systems at mStart Plus d.o.o.

mStart Plus d.o.o. is a Gold level member of Oracle PartnerNetwork (OPN).

Contact Info
Kris Reeves
Oracle PR
+1.925.787.6744
kris.reeves@oracle.com
About Oracle Retail

Oracle is the modern platform for retail. Oracle provides retailers with a complete, open, and integrated platform for best-of-breed business applications, cloud services, and hardware that are engineered to work together. Leading fashion, grocery, and specialty retailers use Oracle solutions to accelerate from best practice to next practice, drive operational agility and refine the customer experience. For more information, visit our website www.oracle.com/retail.

About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

About mStart Plus d.o.o

mStart Plus is a business and technology company that offers complete solutions for infrastructure and optimization of business processes. With over ten years of experience in ERP business systems and with over 340 tech experts on our team mStart Plus has developed, implemented, integrated and supported some of the largest IT systems in the region. mStart Plus, certified for world-leading IT platforms (Oracle, SAP), offers custom software solutions in a large number of industries including agriculture, manufacturing, retail, wholesale, distribution and pharmaceutical industry.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Kris Reeves

  • +1.925.787.6744

Re-partitioning

Jonathan Lewis - Thu, 2019-05-23 05:45

I wrote a short note a little while ago demonstrating how flexible Oracle 12.2 can be about physically rebuilding a table online to introduce or change the partitioning while discarding data, and so on.  But what do you do (as a recent question on ODC asked) if you want to upgrade a customer’s database to meet the requirements of a new release of your application by changing a partitioned table into a composite partitioned table and don’t have enough room to do an online rebuild. Which could require two copies of the data to exist at the same time.)

If you’ve got the down time (and not necessarily a lot is needed) you can fall back on “traditional methods” with some 12c enhancements. Let’s start with a range partitioned table:


rem
rem     Script:         pt_comp_from_pt.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          May 2019
rem

create table pt_range (
        id              number(8,0)     not null,
        grp             varchar2(1)     not null,
        small_vc        varchar2(10),
        padding         varchar2(100)
)
partition by range(id) (
        partition p200 values less than (200),
        partition p400 values less than (400),
        partition p600 values less than (600)
)
;

insert into pt_range
select
        rownum-1,
        mod(rownum,2),
        lpad(rownum,10,'0'),
        rpad('x',100,'x')
from
        all_objects
where
        rownum <= 600
;

commit;

So we’ve got a range-partitioned table with three partitions and some data in each partition. Let’s pretend we want to change this to range/list with the grp column as the subpartition key, allowing explicit use of values 0,1,2 and a bucket subpartition for anything else. First we create an empty version of the table with a suitable subpartition template, and a simple heap table to be used as an exchange medium:


create table pt_range_list (
        id              number(8,0)     not null,
        grp             varchar2(1)     not null,
        small_vc        varchar2(10),
        padding         varchar2(100)
)
partition by range(id)
subpartition by list (grp)
subpartition template (
        subpartition p_def      values(default)
)
(
        partition p200 values less than (200),
        partition p400 values less than (400),
        partition p600 values less than (600)
)
;

prompt  ===============================================
prompt  First nice 12.2 feature - "create for exchange"
prompt  ===============================================

create table t for exchange with table pt_range;

You’ll notice that our subpartition template identifies just a single subpartition that takes default values – i.e. anything for which no explicit subpartition has been identified. This means we have a one to one correspondance between the data segments of the original table and the copy table. So now we go through a tedious loop (which we could code up with a PL/SQL “execute immediate” approach) to do a double-exchange for each partition in turn. (Any PL/SQL code is left as an exercise to the interested reader.)


alter table pt_range exchange partition p200 with table t;
alter table pt_range_list exchange subpartition p200_p_def with table t;

alter table pt_range exchange partition p400 with table t;
alter table pt_range_list exchange subpartition p400_p_def with table t;

alter table pt_range exchange partition p600 with table t;
alter table pt_range_list exchange subpartition p600_p_def with table t;

prompt  =====================================
prompt  Show that we've got the data in place
prompt  =====================================

execute dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user,'pt_range_list',granularity=>'ALL')

break on partition_name skip 1

select  partition_name, subpartition_name, num_rows
from    user_tab_subpartitions
where   table_name = 'PT_RANGE_LIST'
order by
        partition_name, subpartition_name
;


PARTITION_NAME         SUBPARTITION_NAME        NUM_ROWS
---------------------- ---------------------- ----------
P200                   P200_P_DEF                    200

P400                   P400_P_DEF                    200

P600                   P600_P_DEF                    200


3 rows selected.

We now have to split the newly arrived subpartitions into the 4 pieces we want – but before we do that let’s make sure that any new partitions automatically have the correct subpartitions by changing the subpartition template:


alter table pt_range_list
set subpartition template(
        subpartition p_0 values (0),
        subpartition p_1 values (1),
        subpartition p_2 values (2),
        subpartition p_def values (default)
)
;

prompt  =========================================================
prompt  Second nice 12.2 feature - multiple splits in one command
prompt  We could do this online after allowing the users back on.
prompt  =========================================================

alter table pt_range_list split subpartition p200_p_def
        into (
                subpartition p200_p_0 values(0),
                subpartition p200_p_1 values(1),
                subpartition p200_p_2 values(2),
                subpartition p200_p_def
        )
;

alter table pt_range_list split subpartition p400_p_def
        into (
                subpartition p400_p_0 values(0),
                subpartition p400_p_1 values(1),
                subpartition p400_p_2 values(2),
                subpartition p400_p_def
        )
;

alter table pt_range_list split subpartition p600_p_def
        into (
                subpartition p600_p_0 values(0),
                subpartition p600_p_1 values(1),
                subpartition p600_p_2 values(2),
                subpartition p600_p_def
        )
;

Now, just to check that everything is behaving, let’s add a new partition, and check to see what partitions and subpartitions we end up with:


alter table pt_range_list add partition p800 values less than (800);

execute dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user,'pt_range_list',granularity=>'ALL')

select  partition_name, subpartition_name, num_rows
from    user_tab_subpartitions
where   table_name = 'PT_RANGE_LIST'
order by
        partition_name, subpartition_name
;

PARTITION_NAME         SUBPARTITION_NAME        NUM_ROWS
---------------------- ---------------------- ----------
P200                   P200_P_0                      100
                       P200_P_1                      100
                       P200_P_2                        0
                       P200_P_DEF                      0

P400                   P400_P_0                      100
                       P400_P_1                      100
                       P400_P_2                        0
                       P400_P_DEF                      0

P600                   P600_P_0                      100
                       P600_P_1                      100
                       P600_P_2                        0
                       P600_P_DEF                      0

P800                   P800_P_0                        0
                       P800_P_1                        0
                       P800_P_2                        0
                       P800_P_DEF                      0


16 rows selected.

And as a final note – if we decide we want to put it all back we could merge four subpartitions down to one subpartition with a single command – then loop through every partition in turn:


alter table pt_range_list
        merge subpartitions  p200_p_0, p200_p_1, p200_p_2, p200_p_def
        into  subpartition  p200_p_def
;

And now I feel like I’m turning into Tim Hall – writing potentially useful demonstrations instead of trying to baffle people with rocket science. But I hope to get over that quite soon. Of course I have left out some important “real-world” details – particularly how you choose to handle indexes while doing the double-exchange. My view would be to take the local indexes with you on the exchange, bypass the global indexes on the exchange out, and be choosy about which global indexes to maintain on the exchange back in; but it all depends on how much downtime you have, how many indexes there are, and the state they’re likely to start or end in.

As ever it’s possible to start with a simple idea like this, then discover there are real-world complications that have to be dealt with. So there’s another article in the pipeline to handle a slightly more complex case. I’ll also be publishing a short note about the easy way of getting the job done from 18c onwards – if you’ve got the spare resources.

 

WOLF Italian Street Food Beats Lunchtime Rush with Oracle

Oracle Press Releases - Thu, 2019-05-23 03:00
Press Release
WOLF Italian Street Food Beats Lunchtime Rush with Oracle Cloud-based point-of-sale solution enables Italian street food chain to accelerate speed of service and deliver great guest experiences during its busiest moments

London, UK—May 23, 2019

Fast, fresh and healthy Italian street food restaurant, WOLF, has implemented Oracle Food & Beverage Simphony Cloud at point-of-sale to make the most of the lucrative lunchtime rush and support its growth ambitions. Aiming to improve the processes of the restaurant, owner, Tim Entwistle, upgraded the POS solution to increase the speed of service, gain visibility into management information across its franchise network and ensure a solid platform for expected growth. Already WOLF is seeing the benefits with reduced wait times, specifically, a 40 percent improvement.

Some POS solutions cannot keep up with the pressures of a modern restaurant. Services can freeze due to a high volume of orders, or the system needs constant rebooting or manager intervention – a critical issue during the busiest time of the day for a restaurant. In addition, many systems don’t offer data or analysis on menu and employee performance. Oracle Simphony Cloud combined with Oracle’s MICROS Compact Workstations help with these issues while arming WOLF with the tools needed for future growth.

“Our business outgrew our initial tablet POS solution presenting issues such as double charging and system freezes during peak hours, making it obvious the machines couldn’t take the volume of orders we experienced during the lunch rush hour.  We needed a solution that worked, always. It was important for us to think strategically and find a cloud solution that would keep up with the pace of the industry and our business. One that would match our growth ambitions. The solution from Oracle Food and Beverage gives us the reliability we need day to day and the confidence to scale quickly,” said Tim Entwistle, owner of WOLF.

An addition to boosting speed of service, Oracle Simphony Cloud provides powerful analytics delivering valuable operational insights across all areas of restaurant management for faster, smarter decision-making. This includes analysing menu and individual store performance. All critical insights for the growth of WOLF’s business.

Oracle Food and Beverage solutions are assisting WOLF with their future franchise expansions, supporting their ambitions to grow their business across the UK. By having all sites on the same cloud-based software and having powerful insights, WOLF can implement plans for expansion.  

Tim Brown, VP Global Sales Consulting of Oracle Food & Beverage, commented: “Restaurant owners are always looking for ways to increase their revenue, improve their services and expand and grow. With Simphony, WOLF is empowered to analyse each restaurant’s performance, improve its services and look at new expansion options.”

WOLF Italian Street Food currently operates in seven sites across the UK in London, Manchester, Reading, Nottingham and Leeds. They purchased the Oracle Food and Beverage solution in October of 2018 and are now live on the system.

Contact Info
Valerie Beaudett
Oracle
+1 650 400 7833
valerie.beaudett@oracle.com
About Oracle Food and Beverage

Oracle Food and Beverage, formerly MICROS, brings 40 years of experience in providing software and hardware solutions to restaurants, bars, pubs, clubs, coffee shops, cafes, stadiums, and theme parks. Thousands of operators, both large and small, around the world are using Oracle technology to deliver exceptional guest experiences, maximize sales, and reduce running costs.

About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Valerie Beaudett

  • +1 650 400 7833

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